Make a skirt from pant legs DIY | Scrap Fabric Creations

After you cut pants into shorts

You can make a skirt from the cut off legs. Note: the finished length of your skirt will depend on the length you cut your shorts.  A pair of shorts cut with inseams measuring between 1” and 1 1/2” will supply you with the longest span of fabric.  On the other hand, if you cut your shorts at knee length, you will have less to work with. Still, you have the option to use additional materials or trim to increase the width and length of your skirt. The good thing is you can have your skirt even if the pants no longer fit. There are creative ways to make them the right size again but that’s another post.

 

Refresh Your Summer Style

With scrap fabrics, shoe embellishment and repurposed materials

 

The creative summer outfit story

The chic summer outfit pictured above was made up of a combination of scrap fabrics and repurposed materials at minimal costs.

Cut-off trouser legs supplied the materials for the skirt; that has 4 panels and features an exposed metal zipper at the front.

Scraps of navy knit from another project were used to make the top; with its fringe trimmed front neckline and short raglan sleeves.

The zipper clutch came about by piecing together a scrap of African print cotton and a piece of green burlap.

Faux crystal rosettes that started out as curtain tiebacks were fixed to the navy wedges to create subtle embellishment.

 

Turn Pant Legs into a Skirt

And expand your summer wardrobe with scrap fabric creations

 

About Sewing Skills Level and equipment

The following projects require basic sewing skills and equipment and the given instructions are general.

Trimmings are optional and waistlines types are suggestions. If you don’t own an overlock or zigzag machine, you can use pinking shears to finish your seams or sew French seams with your straight stitch machine.

French seams encases raw edges to prevent unravelling.

mini skirt|Pant to skirt refashion

The featured mini skirt was cut with the classic A-line in mind. They are usually made with three pattern pieces: A one-piece front that’s cut on the fold and two back panels with a centre seam. As I worked with repurposed fabric, my skirt has 4 seams. Yet, except for the seam’s visibility at centre front, it doesn’t make a difference.

 

Trouser Cut Pants

-hang straight downward from the widest area of the abdomen at front and largest part of the buttocks at back.

 

Make a few design decisions

Before you make your skirt, decide on how you will finish the waistline and the type of closure you will use; in most cases, a zipper is the easiest choice. Some waistline finishes include, straight waistbands, faced waistbands and elasticized waists. Unless you are working with denim or fabrics of similar weight, you will need to interface your waistband. If using an elastic waistband, facing will not be necessary. I decided on a faced waistband and an exposed front zipper.

Following is a list of supplies I used along with an overview of the construction techniques I used for all projects.

What you will need

Cut off pant legs

Thread

Hook and eye

Fusible interfacing for non elastic waistbands

Separating metal zipper about 2” shorter than finished skirt length

Scissors

Seam ripper -in case you need it

Pins and hand sewing needle

Sewing Machine

Tape measure

Steam iron

Ironing board or Flat padded surface

Skirt construction summary

The pants legs I used had more material than I needed. So, I cut 4 smaller panels. I also faced the waistline and did not add an over or underlap. For that reason, I used a hook and eye to fasten the front.

Step 1. Cut out back and front panels; waistline facings and and front seam facings

Step 2. Fuse waistline facings and front facings

Step 3. Inserted zipper at front

Step 4. Stitch back panels together

Step 5. Stitch front and back panels together

Step 6. Attach waistband facing

Step 7. Sew hook and eye inside front at waistline; hem and press.

Tips

When doing this type of refashion with denim and some sturdy materials, using a steam iron is usually not necessary. Softer fabrics though, will benefit from some steam. Pin and/or baste it will keep you from having to use your seam ripper.

If you’re working with minimal fabric and your skirt feels shorter than you’ll like, you have some options:

Add a border at the hemline using ribbon or lace.

If you’re not into borders, purchase pre-ruffled lace trim or gather your own and attach it to the hemline.

Adding fringe is yet another way to lengthen your skirt; you can buy fringe online, at your local fabric store, or make your own.

See the link at the bottom of the page for instructions on how to make your own fringe.

 

Scrap Fabric Creations

Raglan sleeves are made by combining a part of the neckline and shoulder plus a section of the armhole of a basic bodice. Pictured at right is a variation of the navy fringed trimmed top above. The sketch depicts shorter sleeves and is not blouson style; it anticipates working with scrap fabrics and the possibility of coming up short. Too, you can omit the sleeves and opt for elasticized straps which will require considerably less fabric.

 

The navy Raglan Sleeves Top

Raglan type sleeves are easy choices when you need a fast sew. The drawing above at right is not a true raglan sleeve. However, it is based on the concept and gives an idea of how the top was cut.

It has 3 pattern pieces: Front and back cut on the fold and the sleeves. I didn’t use a purchased pattern.

Finished top measured about 15” from the back of the neckline to back waistline.

Body measurements used: Bust 34” Waist 25” Hips 36”

What You will need

Knit fabric around 7/8 to 1 yard; 45” or 60” wide ; I used scrap fabrics from an earlier project.

Thread

1/4” wide elastic

Fringe or other trim for front neckline

Use 1/2” seam allowance

Knits shrink; pre-wash fabrics

Top Construction summary

Step 1. Stitch front and back together at side seams

Step 2. Hem and press sleeves at lower edges; hem and press bodice at lower edge.

Step 3. Baste or pin sleeves to armhole match seams with right sides together; machine stitch.

Step 4. Serge or use a zigzag stitch along the entire neckline.

Step 5. Stitch elastic to back neckline; turn over and hem entire neckline; topstitch fringe or selected trim along neckline from one back shoulder seam to the other. Choose to trim the whole neckline if you have enough fringe.

Step 6. If you have enough fabric for a blouson, cut your top about 3” longer than desired length to start. Then, mark a line parallel to hemline about 3” upward and stitch elastic along the line.

 

Scrap fabric Creations

—DIY clutch made with two separate pieces of fabric scraps at back and front

 

DIY Scrap fabric clutch

We all need to carry our essentials; this little clutch does that. I used a scrap of printed cotton at the front and a piece go burlap at the back. I didn't fuse the burlap; only the front panel.

What You will need

Burlap or similar fabric for clutch back panel

Cotton or other material for front clutch panel

Thread

Scissors

Zipper

Wooden ring (Optional)

Interfacing

Lining -Scrap fabric

Sewing machine

Steam Iron

Ironing board or paded flat surface

Clutch Construction overview

Step 1. Cut front and back panels; tab if using; lining and interfacing. You may also use one piece of fabric for front and back panels.

Step 2. Fuse panel(s)

Step 3. Make and attach tab if using

Step 4. Attach zipper to exterior panel

Step 5. Attach lining

Step 6. Stitch exterior panel seams

Step 7. Stitch lining seams; leave 6” gap open

Step 8. Sew lining shut; turn over and press

Find helpful step by step instructions by clicking the link at the bottom of the page.

 
 

Embellished summer wedges

Try embellished shoes that catches the rays of summer. Create a quick shoe makeover with a dollar store curtain clip-back. I sewed mine on with needle and thread. It’s a longer process than using glue; feel free to attach your decoration with appropriate adhesive.

What you will need

Shoes or sandals

Rosette or flower of choice

Glue or needle and thread

 

Making a four Gore Skirt

Another design option is a 4-Gore skirt | Exposed navy zippers bring added design elements

 

Making gored Skirts from pant legs

Gored skirts like the one pictured above right can be made with any number of gores/panels. It is another option for your pant legs skirt. Gores can also be designed with various silhouettes including straight, A-line and flared.

Straight-skirts are as their names indicate hang downward straight from the hips.

A-line skirts taper at the waist and flare outward.

Flared Skirts are wider than A-line skirts at the hemlines and come in varied widths.

Whatever skirt you choose, the style of of your pant will likely influence your pant legs to skirt refashion.

Learn more on how to Sew an easy handmade clutch here.

More on Cut long pants into shorts | Make skirt from pant legs here.

Step by step instructions on How to make fringe out of fabric here.

I hope you found ideas that urge you to look through your closet for refashion possibilities. If not, you can always pass by the thrift store and pick up a few. Better yet, tell a friend and make it a collaboration.

Great things can come out of that; have fun and enjoy!

Thank you so much for taking he time to stop by and read.

If the LORD will, see you next time.